Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Secondhand Smoke ADHD

Secondhand Smoke ADHD - Kids who grow up among smokers are more likely than kids in smoke-free homes to suffer from a number of neurobehavioral disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities and conduct disorders.

That's the finding from a new study published online this week in the medical journal Pediatrics.

Researchers from the Tobacco Free Research Institute in Dublin, Ireland, and from the Harvard School of Public Health reviewed data on more than 55,000 U.S. children under the age of 12. (The kids' parents were interviewed as part of the 2007 National Survey on Children's Health.) Of all the kids who grew up in smoke-free homes, 8.6% of them — or about one in 12 — had been diagnosed with at least one neurobehavioral condition. But among kids who lived with a smoker, more than twice as many — 20.4%, or one in five — had been diagnosed.

The study authors warn that that their findings so far are "associational and not necessarily causal," which means that it cannot be known for sure whether secondhand smoke truly causes ADHD, learning disabilities and conduct disorders, or whether there's something else that makes kids of smokers more likely to develop neurobehavioral disorders.

However, the researchers attempted to adjust statistically for other factors they thought might explain the correlation: things like the child's sex, race, and age, as well as the poverty status of the household, the mother's education, whether both parents lived at home, and whether the child was born with low birth weight.

Secondhand Smoke ADHD

Noise Pennsylvania Restaurant Ban Kids

Noise Pennsylvania Restaurant Ban Kids - We all know the phrase "no shirt, no shoes, no service" but one restaurant in Pennsylvania is adding something else to the list -- no kids.

That's the new policy at McDain's restaurant and golf center in Monroeville. The local eatery has been serving customers lunch and dinner for years. But starting next weekend children under the age of six will no longer be welcomed.

The restaurant doesn't want those younger and sometimes noisier guests to ruin the dining experience for others.

"Nothing wrong with babies, but the fact is you can't control their volume. And there may be restaurants that prefer to cater to such things, not here," said restaurant owner Mike Vuick. "I think it's the height of being impolite and selfish."

Noise Pennsylvania Restaurant Ban Kids

Driving Tips to Save Gas

Driving Tips to Save Gas - According to an Autos.ca survey on Fuel–Efficient Driving, high gas prices have motivated most Canadians to either adopt or consider adopting fuel–efficient driving. Among the ones willing to make an effort, 58% said they were willing to reduce unnecessary idling and 56% indicated being ready to drive more smoothly and evenly to reduce their gas consumption.

Proven fuel–efficient driving habits include:

• Moderating Speed

– Why rush? Respecting speed limits is not only safer, it will also reduce your gas consumption.

• Reducing Unnecessary Idling

– Turn–off the engine while waiting for more than 1–2 minutes. It's simple and will help you save on gas consumption with the added benefit of being more environment–friendly.

• Maintaining Proper Tire Pressure

– Check your tire pressure, especially before long trips.

• Avoiding Sudden Accelerations

– Smooth and even driving will not only help you save on gas, but will also reduce your stress level – and frustration from other drivers.

• Follow The Manufacturer's Suggested Vehicle Maintenance

– Change oil and air filters as directed by the manufacturer. Your vehicle will not only be more fuel–efficient, it will also reduce green–house gases.

• Reduce Vehicle Load

– Remove any unnecessary items in your vehicle, such as backpacks, strollers or sports equipment to avoid carrying unnecessary load – and de–clutter at the same time.

Driving Tips to Save Gas